Broadway Improvement Project, Euclid to Country Club

Design & Construction

FAQs

Last updated March 8, 2017

Real Estate

Project Design Decisions

Design And Construction

Project Information

Real Estate

Real Estate

What happened on April 19, 2016? *

On April 19, 2016 Mayor and Council adopted Resolution 22557 which provides TDOT the authority to begin property acquisitions in conjunction with the Broadway Corridor improvements. City and RTA policy required that a 30% plan be completed prior to authority to acquire being granted. The 30% plan was posted on the www.BroadwayBoulevard.info website. Mayor and Council also authorized entering into an Intergovernmental Agreement (IGA) with the RTA for a portion of the funds needed to complete this project. The completed IGA was approved by the RTA on April 28, 2016.
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Project Design Decisions

What did Mayor and Council approve on June 9, 2015?

The Tucson Mayor and Council approved the Broadway: Euclid to Country Club Baseline Alignment Concept to include six travel lanes with bus pullouts where possible,  six-foot-wide sidewalks, and six-foot-wide bicycle lanes, which is consistent with and supports the project scope and design provided by the Regional Transportation Authority and Pima County.  In conjunction with the alignment, they approved technical parameters which provide guidance on sidewalks, bike lanes, transit facilities, landscaping and water harvesting.

Click here to view the full Resolution No. 22410 (PDF 4.8MB), passed by Mayor and Council on June 9, 2015.
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How does this decision differ from the General Alignment approved on October 9, 2014?

The General Alignment approved by the Mayor and Council on October 9, 2014 identified that the future roadway cross-section would be six lanes.  The Mayor and Council directed the Broadway Corridor team to bring back a refined alignment concept for formal adoption, which is what took place June 9, 2015. 
 
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What is the Broadway Boulevard, Euclid to Country Club Improvement Project?

The Broadway Boulevard, Euclid to Country Club Improvement Project is one of 35 roadway improvement projects included in the Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) Plan approved by Pima County voters in 2006. The original 8-lane roadway was reduced to 6 lanes with bus pull outs based on public input and the approval by the Tucson Mayor and Council and the Regional Transportation Authority Board.  It is managed by the City of Tucson and will widen Broadway from Euclid Avenue to Country Club Road to a 6-lane roadway, with medians, bike lanes and sidewalks, and with bus pullouts where appropriate. Construction is anticipated to begin in 2019. 
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How much will it cost and where is the funding coming from?

The total amount of funds allocated for the project is $71.3 million. Approximately $42 million will be provided by the RTA, with another $25 million coming from the 1997 Pima County Transportation Bond Improvement Plan, and $3 million from the City of Tucson.
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Why does the City use the parameters outlined in the AASHTO "Policy on Geometric Design of Highways and Streets", sometimes referred to as "the Green Book," to determine the design of a road? Isn't this book just a guideline?

The nation’s State highway departments work through the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) to develop design standards.  The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) requires that the AASHTO standards be utilized in the design of roadway geometry for roads listed in its National Highway System, as does the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT), regardless of the funding used for the project (23 CFR 625 Design Standards for Highways).  For all of these reasons, the City of Tucson follows the AASHTO design standards.

A roadway not built to the required standards is considered sub-standard.
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Doesn't the City's Major Streets and Routes Plan (MS&R) allow for no median through historic districts?

The MS&R provides policy-level guidance on the design of city arterial and collector streets. The MS&R contains policy 5.A.1 on page 20 regarding guidelines for "Landscaping of gateway routes". The policy provides for the option of having non-landscaped medians through historic districts in order to shrink the size of the median (landscaping requires greater widths) to avoid impacts to historic buildings along the street. The baseline alignment, adopted by the Mayor and Council for Broadway, includes a median throughout the entire corridor for safety and pedestrian crossing purposes. The median will only be landscaped when there is sufficient width to do so without impacting buildings. 
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Design And Construction

When will construction begin?

The tentative schedule anticipates utility relocations to begin in late 2018 with construction occurring in 2019.  However, until the project reaches 100% design, this timeframe is preliminary.
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What is "60% design"?

The design plans are measured by completion of specific tasks leading to 100% complete plans.  Typical submissions are made at 30%, 60%, 90% and 100% complete.  
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Project Information

What is the Citizens Task Force role moving forward?

The Citizens Task Force fulfilled their primary responsibilities by developing their recommendations of the baseline alignment and technical design parameters.  Following the adoption of the baseline alignment, the project team has focused on technical design work to bring the plans to a 60% completed design.  Another open house will be held prior to construction.
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How can I stay connected to the project during the technical design phase?

Moving forward there will be a number of ways the public will be able to get information and provide input and comments.  Most of these options can be found on the News & Events page:

  •   Website
  •   Periodic email newsletters
  •  Ombudsperson Process:  Any property owner or tenant potentially impacted  by the project can request a meeting with James MacAdam.  Any stakeholder  or neighborhood group outside of the immediate project area can also request a  meeting with James. Click for contact information.
  •  60% Design Open House:  Scheduled for March 9, 2017.  During the 60% to  100% Design Phase, there will be additional opportunities to provide input on  land use, streetscape and landscape design elements, public art and district  branding elements.
  •  Corridor Vision and Land Use Tool Process: Will include workshops to be  scheduled in the Spring of 2017.  

What is the design process for the project moving forward?

The project team will be continuing design drawings that incorporate features such as elevations of the road and surrounding area; placement of utilities; ADA requirements; street lighting; signing, striping, and signal layouts; retaining wall plans; paving, profile, and staking plans; landscaping; storm drain details.   The next design milestone will be the 90% plan.

Periodic updates will be posted to the project website. Another informational open house will be scheduled prior to construction.    
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Real Estate

I have looked at the 60% design plans. Are the lines on this map final?

The conceptual alignment has undergone a technical design process to develop detailed construction plans.  It currently reflects a more informed location of the improvements.  Until 100% design plans have been completed, the design could be subject to change.
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When do you expect to have completed a plan that shows the impact to my property?

The 60% project alignment is now posted on the Broadway Improvement Project website at www.broadwayboulevard.info.  It shows the potential impacts to properties.  However, it is important to note that the design will continue to be reviewed and could be subject to revisions until final design completion.
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How many properties will be impacted? How many buildings will need to be demolished?

Currently, the 60% design plan has impacted 27 buildings with 50 potential full property acquisitions. Full acquisitions are anticipated because some properties may lose parking, have no driveway access onto the property, and may not be able to comply with minimum City Code and development requirements for site features such as loading zones, trash collection, or public safety access.
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If the City buys a property, does that mean it will be demolished?

It is our intent to preserve as many buildings as possible.  Potential historic designations will be considered for each property the City acquires, along with its condition and future potential use.
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How will I know if I have property that the City will need for the future roadway?

You will be contacted by staff from Tierra Right-of Way Services, acting on behalf of the City of Tucson Real Estate Division. They will explain the process and provide the necessary information.  You may also want to check out the 60% project alignment now posted on the Broadway Improvement Project website at www.broadwayboulevard.info, where you can view the potential impacts to your property.
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Can something be done to alleviate the City's requirements for parking, which triggers acquisition of property?

Changing City parking requirements does not alleviate the requirement to purchase the property needed for the roadway project.  If the City needs property to construct the future public roadway, the City of Tucson is required to pay ‘Fair Market Price’ for any private property it acquires.  This price is determined by a 3rd party appraisal of the property. Article 2, Sec. 17 of the Arizona Constitution’s “just compensation” clause requires cash payments (in money); not compensation in the form of non cash regulatory benefits, like waiving requirements.
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Why can't parking solutions be drawn in the roadway design plans?

The City cannot show parking solutions on what is currently private property. Additionally, the City cannot compel an owner to sell property that is outside of the required right-of-way. Further, the City cannot assume a private owner’s ability to use remnant properties for parking in the roadway planning process. Plans with parking solutions drawn on remnant property cannot be finalized as they assume that the property will be used for this purpose; however, this decision must be made by the property owner.
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When do I need to move from my property?

If it is necessary for the City to purchase your property and you are required to relocate, a relocation specialist from Tierra Right of Way Services contact you.  The first step is to determine your needs to accomplish a successful move to your new location.   You will be informed of your rights and benefits as an owner or tenant displaced by a project.  A written determination of the relocation assistance, advisory services, and reimbursement payments you are eligible for will also be provided to you.  We encourage you to work closely with your relocation specialist.  They will provide guidance and information which is meant to help with the transition to your new location.
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What can I do now as a business owner?

Businesses in the project area are eligible to receive free services from the RTA’s MainStreet Business Assistance Program aimed to help them prepare for roadway construction or relocation. The MainStreet Program offers a wide spectrum of services and the project team encourages business owners to contact them – at the very least – to set up an initial, confidential consultation. Visit rtamobility.com/mainstreet.aspx to learn more about their services and find contact information to schedule an appointment.
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What can I do as a tenant?

Tenants are encouraged to stay in contact with the owner of the property where they are renting. Real estate negotiations occur between the City and the property owner – it very important for the tenant to maintain contact with the property owner to ensure that they are informed about the potential acquisition process that is taking place.
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What regulatory relief can I seek for my business now? What land use tools are available for my property?

As design for the Broadway Corridor project advances, the project team will be able to provide a better idea of the impacts to each property and property owners will be able to evaluate how access will be provided for their property. A PDSD/IP omsbudsman is available to assist property owners with developing the next steps. There are a variety of materials available under the current City’s Unified Development Code (UDC) that provide guidance on how to proceed with reconfiguring your property (See materials online at www.tucsonaz.gov/broadway/business).
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